Fantasy Football 2017 – The real stuff. I.E. What to call my team.

Well, starting off 0-1 is never great. Which means I have to change my name to break the curse.

Yes. One game is a curse. It’s a tough gayme for tough peeple. And there’s only 12 games in the season you know.

So good bye to 50 Fades to Clay (although this year that actually might come true, finally). We’re on to:

Three’s a Crowder.

Bills at Panthers (preview)

17 September 2017: Bills at Panthers (Preview)

The Bills have only played the Panthers six times, and so far it’s been almost all Buffalo. The Bills are 5-1 against the Panthers in previous games, including the first win of EJ Manuel’s illustrious  career. The Panthers only win was in 2005 when Jake Delhomme beat another Bills Wall of Fame quarterback by the name of J.P. Losman.

Game on CBS.

NFL.com preview video for Buffalo Bills at Carolina Panthers 

Madden highlights of sim game

 

 

 

Netgear ReadyNAS with MOCA and FIOS: DHCP and WAN access problem and solution

Problem: My ReadyNAS 6 would not pull an IP via DHCP when connected via MOCA. Even when a static IP was assigned, it had no Internet access. With a static IP and the router assigned as gateway it was accessible by all LAN participants, but no WAN – a problem for cloud backup.

Solution: Static IP, Bonded NIC using XOR (even though I don’t have it connected to a managed switch or one that should permit XOR connections) using Layer 2+3 connection.

Update 25 AUG 17: Layer 2 only appears to be faster at switching (no pun intended.) I used 2+3 originally because I expected the Layer 2 association would work for LAN/devices behind the router and IPs for the Internet past the home router would be seen via Layer 3. This worked…intermittently. Layer 2 alone works much more consistently so far.

Facts:

  1. Other PCs (minus VMs – see #4 below) did pull IPs via DHCP when connected either directly to the MOCA bridge (I use the Actiontec ECB6200K02).
  2. There is a mix of MOCA 1.1 and MOCA 2 devices on the LAN, but neither exceeds the total amount of MOCA devices permitted by MOCA standards.
  3. If I connected the ReadyNAS to the wireless bridge connected via AC (5GHz) to the Fios provided wireless router, the ReadyNAS would get an IP via DHCP and could access Internet
  4. (Possibly relevant) my Hyper-V virtual machines also had difficulties pulling IPs or getting WAN/Internet access even with static IPs when going through a switch connected to the MOCA bridge. Again, any stand-alone PCs had no issues, including the machine hosting the VMs
  5. Tried assigning separate static IPs in IPV4 and IPV6 to the two NICs in the ReadyNAS
  6. Tried static routing one NIC to LAN IPs (192.168.1.0) and the other to Internet/WAN (didn’t work)
  7. Tried connecting one NIC to the switch connected to MOCA bridge and the other to the wireless bridge in conjunction with #6 (also didn’t work)
  8. I needed to use the MOCA bridge because it gives me Gbit connectivity to separate building housing the ReadyNAS. The wireless bridge is decent, but at best ~300Mbps and often less.
I do highly recommend these Actiontec coax to Ethernet adapters.

As mentioned, they use MOCA 2.0 with bonded channels to get actual 1000Mb/Gbit speeds between the two buildings. Even over multiple coax splitters, and while using MOCA to get my WAN connection from Frontier (yuck) Fios.

If you already have a MOCA service (i.e. most fiber to the home providers), you probably only need one as your router is pushing information to your TV set boxes via MOCA, and the Actiontec can pair up with it.

If you don’t, you’ll need at least a pair. I only needed one, but they work so well I’m glad I purchased two. The latency and speed really is equivalent to running Ethernet and all the rooms in both buildings (main house and in-law apartment) were already wired with coax but not completely with Ethernet.

 

 

Xbox One controller(s) won’t reconnect wirelessly to Windows 10

Symptom: Xbox One controller connects initially to the wireless adapter, but after turning off or disconnecting they will not reconnect. Requires a reboot to allow controller(s) to reconnect.

Work around:
1. Close Steam until the controller is connected, then restart Steam (if desired.) This was my and the majority of the people with the issue’s solution – See Gabriel Barsali’s post on the 4th page of Xbox One Wireless controller keeps disconnecting.

2. If you have the newer (Xbox One S and later with Bluetooth) controllers, try removing the Bluetooth Xbox Controller adapter from the Bluetooth & other devices window in Settings/Devices. If you disable Bluetooth (or remove the Bluetooth dongle) before removing the Bluetooth Xbox Controller Adapter it will appear “grayed out” in the Bluetooth & other devices window; you can’t delete it without Bluetooth on. (Of course.) This was not my issue, but is a potential solution listed by others.

3. Some feel uninstalling GeForce Experience is required. I have GeForce Experience running and this did not cause a conflict for me. It was definitely a conflict with Steam and the new Steam capability to manage non-Steam controllers.

The Bills just quit.

Pathetic.

As a 40+ year Buffalo Bills’ fan, I’m not unfamiliar with having the season be effectively over by December. I’m also numb to losing playoff chances to the Steelers late in the season (damn you Willie Parker.) But this…this was both different and unfortunately too much the same.

It’s one thing to lose because your favorite team is just worse, but trying. It’s another entirely to see that team clearly playing in a fog, like they just can’t or won’t try to win. That’s how it looked on Sunday. The only time I enjoyed myself was listening to the obscenely loud “BONNNNGGG” as Carpenter’s extra point caromed off the left goal post in a perfect example of the Bills’ 2016 season. It was a perverse enjoyable moment, because I gave up on this game about 90 seconds later than the Bills team already had, and I just had to laugh. Or poke my eyes out, and I still had to go to work the next day. And actually perform.

I usually mark my posts with the category/categories they fall under. Normally for these posts that means NFL and Buffalo Bills. It definitely was a Bills game, but I’m not sure both teams on Sunday deserved to be labeled as NFL.

Suffice to say I’m not uploading this video, unless someone absolutely begs me to. And they’re not a Steelers’ fan.

Believeland

Believeland

Francisco Lindor…gotta love it.

“They were custom made with Cleveland’s skyline on them. … I believe in my team. I believe in my city. And it’s cool. [They’re] cool shoes and I believe. I believe in my team. I believe in what we have, the glory is God’s. We’re just trying to do our thing.”

The whole team is definitely doing their thing.

Run Plex app (Windows 10) from Steam – or how to run a Win 10 app from a shortcut

Update 2: 18 June 2017. Added quotation marks around the command in the batch file to allow for any spaces.

Update 1: 20 NOV 2016: Added a tweak to the batch file before you make it an executable to add some compatibility with Steam and nVidia streaming.

Background: I use the Steam Link to remotely play games on my family room TV. It’s basically a glorified remote desktop/streaming device.

Wouldn’t it be great if it could play Plex remotely so I could watch movies, TV, etc? In order to do this, you have to launch the application you want to view from within Steam. Easy enough for a “traditional” x86 app (i.e. one that is the type “something.exe”) but more difficult to launch a Windows Store application. As anyone who has tried knows, they are not only hidden, but don’t launch with an executable file.

Attempt 1: I tried launching using the shortcut to the Plex app – which sort of worked.

If you want to get a shortcut to any application, Windows Store or traditional, the best way I’ve found is to open the hidden “Applications” folder and create/drag a shortcut. You can open this hidden folder by going to “Run” (shortcut: Windows key + R) and type shell:AppsFolder then hit OK (or press enter.)

I created a shortcut to the Plex app, moved it to my D: drive, and used that shortcut in Steam as a non-Steam app to launch the Plex App. Problem was, although it would launch, it would always have an error box behind it.

Attempt 2 – Et voila!: A bit more complicated, but works very well. Basically you create a batch file that runs the shortcut, and turn the batch file into an executable file.

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